Looking to learn more about what’s trending in education? Here’s a recap of this week’s top education news. Let us know what you think about this week’s news in the comments below.

Report: Part-Time Students Overlooked
Inside Higher Ed
A new report from the Center for American Progress reveals that part-time students are often overlooked by colleges, policy makers and researchers who are looking to increase national college attainment.

Plagued by scandal, for-profit colleges target single mothers
MarketWatch
Student parents are often motivated to attend college out of a desire to create a better life for themselves and their families. But many single mothers in college may be at risk of spending a lot of money on their schooling with little payoff, new research indicates.

Forget ‘US News’ Rankings. For Online College Programs, Google Is Kingmaker
EdSurge
In a time of towering tuition costs, it’s easy to criticize colleges for trying to differentiate themselves by building climbing walls, luxury dorms or lazy rivers. But as more colleges move to offer online programs, there’s another new cost that has nothing to do with delivering education: buying ads on Google and other online platforms to hook new students.

Senate panel rejects Trump’s proposed federal education cuts
Washington Post
The Senate Appropriations Committee voted overwhelmingly Thursday to approve a spending bill that rejects President Trump’s proposed cuts to education funding for fiscal year 2018 and, for now at least, derails the administration’s goal of directing federal dollars toward promoting and expanding school choice and private school vouchers.

The Sky Is Not Falling (Yet)
Inside Higher Ed
Inside Digital Learning contacted a dozen universities that offer only online courses or blend face-to-face and online offerings, to find out about their year-over-year enrollment numbers. The data reveal pockets of shallow growth, and in a few cases, mild depreciation. But overall, doomsday warnings about the impending bottoming-out aren’t reflected in the numbers or the comments of observers we contacted.

‘We didn’t know it was this bad’: New ACT scores show huge achievement gaps
Washington Post
New results from the nation’s most widely used college admission test highlight in detailed fashion the persistent achievement gaps between students who face disadvantages and those who don’t. Scores from the ACT show that just 9 percent of students in the class of 2017 who came from low-income families, whose parents did not go to college, and who identify as black, Hispanic, American Indian or Pacific Islander are strongly ready for college.

Trump Will End DACA in 6 Months, Confirming Dreamers’ Fears and Putting Onus on Congress
Chronicle of Higher Education
A program that has given some 800,000 undocumented immigrants a chance to attend college, work, and build lives in the United States without fear of immediate deportation will be phased out after a six-month delay to give Congress a chance to come up with a legislative fix, the U.S. attorney general, Jeff Sessions, announced on Tuesday. 

Silicon Valley Courts Brand-Name Teachers, Raising Ethics Issues
New York Times
Many public schools are facing tight budgets, and administrators, including the principal at Ms. Delzer’s school, said they welcomed potentially valuable free technology and product training. Even so, some education experts warned that company incentives might influence teachers to adopt promoted digital tools over rival products or even traditional approaches, like textbooks.

International Enrollments: From Flat to Way Down
Inside Higher Ed
After years in which American universities enjoyed steady growth in numbers of foreign students, many institutions expect international enrollments to be flat or down — in some cases significantly — this fall.

Going Online When Disaster Strikes
Inside Higher Ed
Texas colleges devastated by Hurricane Harvey are moving face-to-face courses online. Institutions in other disaster-prone states share their digital strategies.

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