Looking to learn more about what’s trending in education? Here’s a recap of this week’s top education news. Let us know what you think about this week’s news in the comments below.

Who Is Studying Online (and Where)
Inside Higher Ed
The number of college students enrolled in at least one online course — and the proportion of all enrolled students who are studying online — continued to rise at U.S. institutions in the 2016 academic year, newly released federal data show.

Trump Administration Seeks Curbs on Student-Loan Forgiveness
Wall Street Journal
The Trump administration is considering making it harder for former college students who accuse schools of fraudulent behavior to have their student loans forgiven.

Concerns Mount Over K-12 Education Plans
U.S. News & World Report
As states cement education plans for their schools under the federal K-12 law, the Department of Education is working furiously to assess them amid mounting concerns about states’ commitment to following the law, their proposals to ensure historically disadvantaged students have access to quality education, and the department’s capacity – and in some cases, lack of desire – to police it all.

As Flow of Foreign Students Wanes, U.S. Universities Feel the Sting
New York Times
…Just as many universities believed that the financial wreckage left by the 2008 recession was behind them, campuses across the country have been forced to make new rounds of cuts, this time brought on, in large part, by a loss of international students.

CAOs tell all on their top 4 IT priorities
eCampus News
A resounding majority of chief academic officers (CAOs) (86 percent) said they believe digital learning tools and resources make learning more efficient and effective for students, according to a recent survey.

Here’s how Washington could shape higher education in 2018
Washington Post
The year ahead could usher in significant changes in the federal government’s role in higher education. Events set in motion in 2017 will loom large, though resolutions may be years in the making. Here are a few things worth watching in the coming months.

Apprenticeships? Competency-Based Programs? GOP-Led Overhaul of Higher Ed Looks to Push These Concepts Into Mainstream
The 74
Rising tuition costs and increasing skepticism about the value of the traditional four-year degree are causing students, higher education organizations, and government officials to turn to alternative programs that are touted as cheaper, more flexible, and based on skills rather than classroom hours.

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