Looking to learn more about what’s trending in education? Here’s a recap of this week’s top education news. Let us know what you think about this week’s news in the comments below.

Tracking ‘Invisible Colleges’
Inside Higher Ed
Developments since 1967 at small, private, nonelite colleges are the subject of new research, providing rarely seen insight into changes over time in one of the most worried-about sectors in higher ed.

How Admissions Works at Online Bachelor’s Programs
U.S. News & World Report
Contrary to what some prospective students believe, online bachelor’s programs aren’t always easier to get into than those offered on a physical campus. That’s one of several findings based on an analysis of data that schools submitted to U.S. News in an annual survey about admission to online colleges

Snapshot of K-12 Tech Landscape: More Districts Reach 1-to-1, But Equity Gaps Persist
Education Week
…A recent survey by the Consortium for School Networking reveals a landscape that is improving, in terms of the number of devices in schools–despite continued worries about equitable access to fast and reliable internet connectivity for all students.

Opinion: Does Your Institution Really Need a New LMS?
Inside Higher Ed
Colleges and universities should avoid “shiny new object syndrome” when considering if they need to move to a new learning management system, writes Sasha Thackaberry.

Small College Struggles in the Sights
Inside Higher Ed
The Council of Independent Colleges has been among the most bullish organizations when discussing the state of small private liberal arts colleges, but a heightened sense of concern underpinned much of the organization’s annual Presidents Institute this year.

Are Prospective Students About to Disappear?
Inside Higher Ed
…Optimists and plenty of others in higher education may be concerned by Demographics and the Demand for Higher Education (Johns Hopkins University Press), in which Nathan D. Grawe (right) suggests a bleak outlook for most institutions when it comes to attracting and enrolling students.

Today’s College Students Aren’t Who You Think
Wall Street Journal
…Today’s college students aren’t just 18-year-olds living in cramped dorm rooms on ivy-covered campuses. Rather, the men and women who attend college often work at least part-time to cover their tuition and living costs, enroll in schools they were guaranteed to get into and major in professionally focused degrees like business and nursing.

New Analysis of Student Loan Default Data
Inside Higher Ed
The looming student loan crisis is worse than previously thought, according to a new analysis of federal data on student loan default, which the U.S. Department of Education released in October. The Brookings Institution published the report, which was written by Judith Scott-Clayton, a senior fellow at Brookings and an associate professor of economics and education at Columbia University’s Teachers College.

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